10+ Ways To Use Photos In A Therapy Session

pediatrictherapeuticservices photos1. Camera and pictures as positive reinforcement. Kids love pictures - looking at them, taking them, being in them. Photographs of pets and children can be an ice breaker with a new student. You can reward a great job by letting the child take a picture of his work, and allowing the child to bring pictures from home to show the therapist can be especially rewarding - which bring us to number 2! 2. Photos as a conversation starter. Portable, interesting, and universal, bringing in a few photos of family and pets can be a great starting point for a speech group activity! Having a "show and tell" provides an opportunity to practice social skills as well as language use! Turn taking, adding details, and pronoun use are just a few ways a photo can get our students talking! On his blog, speech-language pathologist Erik Raj recently posted an entry in his blog titled "Using Your Cell Phone Photos as Speech Therapy Story Starters", check it out for more ideas! 3. Photos as data collection. Because digital cameras are so easily accessible, including cell phone cameras, it is both inexpensive and convenient to take photographs of student work. This can be a way to be greener, and use less paper. Use a dry erase board for writing practice, snap a quick picture, and erase! Photos can record writing samples that may be completed during a push-in classroom session, when student work may be handed in to a teacher. Also, taking a picture can support a school-based therapist's memory when a prized piece of artwork is brought home before the note is written!

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Research Update: Brain Development, Mindfulness, Autism, and Educational Engagement

Salk scientists discover previously unknown requirement for brain development Salk researchers are publishing an article this month in Science magazine. Their experiment on mice found that when the thalamus is disconnected from the cortex of the brain during development visual processing was affected. The thalamus is a centrally located area of the brain primarily involved with connecting other areas of the brain involved with sensory processing and movement. It also controls sleep and levels of consciousness. When this area was separated from the cerebral cortex at birth in the mutated mice, differentiation between higher and lower level visual processing areas did not occur. This resulted in deficits in visual perception and other higher level visual tasks. This is new information, as it was previously thought that this differentiation was determined solely through genetics and predisposed to occur. Researcher Dennis O'Leary and his team are planning to continue researching areas of the brain related to autism and other developmental disorders.

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